Indian Charoset

I wanted to highlight the flavors of the Jewish Experience in India. Did you know that Jews have lived in India for over 2,500 years and were the first foreign religious group to enter the country?

It is not surprising that the combination of Indian flavors and Jewish Tradition creates such a delicious and unique recipe. We hope that you will love the combination of flavors of the mango, papaya, and cashews along with aromatic Indian Spices.

Makes approximately 3 cups

Ingredients

  • 1 large papaya (or 2 small), peeled, seeded and finely chopped
  • 1 cup dried mango, diced
  • 3/4 cup whole raw cashews
  • juice of 1 lemon
  • 1/2 tsp freshly grated peeled ginger
  • 1/4 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/8 tsp each ground cloves and cardamom

Instructions

Mix all ingredients together and serve. Recommend making fresh but you can make it a day ahead and refrigerate it.   If you would like to tailor your recipe, you can add ground date paste to symbolize the mortar the slaves used to build the walls during their slavery in Egypt. This is a tradition of the Bene Israel Indian Jews.

Related Posts

Indian-Jewish Sangria I wanted to highlight the flavors of the Jewish Experience in India. Did you know that Jews have lived in India for over 2,500 years and were the firs...
Yemenite Charoset Given my extensive travel in the Middle East, I thought that including a Charoset from Yemen to highlight the Jewish experience beyond Israel was impo...
Spanish Sephardic Charoset Spanish Sephardic Charoset relies on the local bounty that grows on the Iberian Peninsula. Pears, pistachios, figs and hazelnuts highlight this tapas ...
Etrog Marmalade (Jemma’s Jam) My daughter Jemma and I love to cook together. One of the first recipes we ever made together was cranberry jelly for Thanksgiving. We enjoyed the can...
Moroccan Charoset Dates, walnuts and cloves give this charoset its deep color and thick consistency. We love the delicious tangy flavor and smooth texture. It is so ric...

One Comment

Sabrina Kerbel

Thank you for posting this interesting charoset recipe. My parents and family are from the B’nai Israel community in India and the traditional charoset we make is made only from dates (what is now known as date molasses or silan). Dates are soaked in water, boiled, strained through a cheesecloth, then the remaining juice is boiled until a thick syrup. Ground walnuts are then sprinkled on top when ready to serve. There is quite a sizable B’nai Israel community in Toronto, Ontario (Canada), and we all make our charoset this way. The recipe you provided, while it sounds delicious, is definitely not the traditional B’nai Israel charoset.

Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *